The Global Games Group Stage is over, and the finalists are known!

The Hearthstone official website reads:

In the Hearthstone Global Games tournament, teams from around the world go head to head to see which country is home to the greatest Hearthstone players on Earth, but there’s a twist – [the Community] decides who gets to be on each team!

The premises are simple enough, countries battle it out with cards to determine the World’s very best, with a Cash Prize of over $300,000. There has been no less than 48 countries (28 from Europe, 7 Americas and 13 from Asia-Pacific) that took part in the Group Stage, itself divided into 3 separate stages.

Click on the Stage Links to see the full details of each stage, group and match, with Classes and Replays!

Stage 1: Round of 48

From April to June, the First Stage was a Round-Robin with 8 groups of 6 countries each. Half of the teams got eliminated, with the first 3 teams of each group advancing forward to the second Stage:

Stage 2: Round of 24

Only 24 teams remained for the Second Round-Robin Stage, which featured 6 groups of 4 countries each. This time again, half of the teams were qualified for the next round, and the 4 best 3rd teams also passed, which was a chance for Belgium, Taiwan, Ukraine and Italy:

Qualifying Bracket

Finally, this Group Stage ended on a Qualifying Bracket, to determine the last 4 teams that will go to the GamesCom in August to know which would become the World Champion:

We now know the four teams still in the course to win this first edition of the Global Games:

  • Players: JáraVyskočil – pokrovac – StanCifka – CzechCloud
  • Players: HotMEOWTH – dog – Firebat – Amnesiac
  • Players: handsomeguy – Kranich – Flurry – DDaHyoNi
  • Players: DrHippi – NickChipper – Kolento – Neirea

Some numbers, statistics and trivia

All statistics gathered thanks to the Toornament API.

Throughout the 3 first stages of the competition, there have been:

  • 168 Matches (all were Bo5)
  • 686 Games
  • An average of 4.1 Games per Match

The most disputed Stage 1 group was Group G with an average of 4.4 games per match!
It got even closer during the Stage 2, with the Group F averaging 4.7 games per match!

No team was able to win all of its matches (the closest was South Korea with a 80% Match WinRate and 66.7% Game WinRate so far), but a team managed to lose all of its matches: Kazakhstan, which only managed to score 5 games in 5 matches.

What are the favorite classes of the players having taken part in the competition?
218 picks (15.89%)
203 picks (14.80%)
185 picks (13.48%)
181 picks (13.19%)
179 picks (13.05%)
163 picks (11.88%)
131 picks (9.55%)
86 picks (6.27%)
26 picks (1.90%)

Next rendez-vous is during the Gamescom, in Cologne in the end of August, so stay tuned to Toornament for all the results and data on your favorite tournaments!

How can Toornament improve your event production?

A few weeks back was hosted the ESWC Summer, in Bordeaux, France. There, hundreds of participants and thousands of enthusiasts gathered for 2 days of intense competitive gaming action.
For this new edition, the ESWC once more trusted Toornament for its competition management, using the platform from registrations to result reporting on site, and as the main tool at the heart of their production line, with a Live Website and a streamlined video production, for both online and offline assets.
Let’s see how they used Toornament to create this new live environment!

Live Website

The ESWC Production staff, led by Sylvain Maillard, created a Live Mod on the ESWC Website. There, you can navigate between games, and within each game, between the different official live streams for the competition (most of the competitions were streamed in several languages). In every case, you’d have a panel with all information about the tournament, gathered through the Toornament API (schedule, latest results, participants data, statistics etc.).


Here you can see the Live Website, a unique and clear website with all information for spectators: embedded live stream and panel with live results from the competition.


Each participant, individual or team, also had his own profile, with its lineup, achievements, latest results and schedule in the competition.

Icing on the cake, the whole thing was fully responsive (so also available on mobile) and automated, so the ESWC Production Team could focus on the event and tournaments once it all started, while the website handled itself communicating with Toornament for its updates.

Streaming Production

The event featured several tournaments, each with several live streams, and a clear yet complex problematic emerged: how to streamline and centralize the management of overlays to display the tournaments information, with rankings, groups, brackets and sponsors.
For the Clash Royale tournament for example, there were 4 official streams, in different languages, and matches were played in the Gaming Zone and on stage at the same time.
The solution has been the creation of several overlays, covering tournaments, with all stages and matches available to be quickly used in the different productions.


A group, a bracket, and a single match page in the ESWC Overlay, with up-to-date information gathered from Toornament.

Time to let the man behind these tools talk!

Hello Toornament.com! I am Sylvain Maillard, and I work with the ESWC staff since 2006, first as tournament manager and for a short while as content manager. Created in 2003, the ESWC is one of the oldest esports competitions. Today a convention-type event, the ESWC consists of several events a year, where we manage or host video games competitions, notably for publishers.
Come and read the complete interview in the
detailed UseCase about the ESWC Summer!

With our open API, you too can optimize your production process for all your tournaments and events, so if you are an organizer with a project, don’t hesitate contacting us to see how we can help you!

UseCase: ESWC Summer 2017

If you do not have seen it yet, we highly recommend you take a good look and read at the Event Production showcase we did with the ESWC Summer. We have met with Sylvain Maillard to discuss his new toolbox and the whole process.

Please introduce yourself and the ESWC in a few words

Hello Toornament.com! I work with the ESWC staff since 2006, first as tournament manager and for a short while as content manager. Created in 2003, the ESWC is one of the oldest esports competitions. Today a convention-type event, the ESWC consists of several events a year, where we manage or host video games competitions, notably for publishers. Recently, Winter and Summer events in France featured, among others, international tournaments of Call of Duty, Clash Royale, Street Fighter V or League of Legends.

My work is to organize tournaments during the events, define their formats and schedule, and make sure the communication around the event is good, especially with our gamers’ communities through our numerous supports (website, social networks etc.). I also assist technical teams on content creation to display on live streams.

We have seen your amazing video production, what were the needs leading to the creation of these tools?

One of 2017 goals for the ESWC was to improve the spectators’ experience and the tournaments information we could offer both on our website and the live streams. Indeed, fans are more and more eager for data about the participants of the tournaments, with personal information and their previous performances, or detailed statistics. We had to offer this content on tournaments with lots of participants and results, and it had to remain possible for the teams to manage it during a live event.

We were already using Toornament.com to handle participants registrations and the results reporting. But the additional data we then displayed on our streams were created with imported data from Toornament.com or hand-gathered and compiled within sheets that were then read by our streaming tools. This didn’t allow good reaction times during a live event and was a lot of extra work to update the visual assets. We were looking for a solution to have a unique and automatized source to display on all supports.

What technology are you using? What challenges appeared and how did you tackle them?

The API from Toornament.com has been the cornerstone of our new display system, both for the ESWC website and the visual assets of the live streams. With calls to the API, data to be displayed are automatically gathered with PHP Scripts that autonomously build a webpage ready to be shown on stream. We also created a small web interface that would have all of the available assets for all parts of the competition, available with a single click.

This system notably allows the video productor and his assistants not to bother with updating the visual assets to be displayed on screen. All they have to do is select the needed page, depending on what information about the tournament they need to display.

The main challenge was to create and prepare all those assets beforehand. For the Clash Royale tournament for example, added to the participants and matches displays, no less than 4 assets were necessary for the Final Bracket, depending on what you wanted to display (Full Bracket, Winner Bracket, Loser Bracket and Top-8). This was made with HTML/PHP and had to be ready long before the event, with details tailored for each tournament and discipline.

What is, for you, the next step in this project’s evolution?

The ESWC Summer has been a great feedback on the experience of this new system. We still have work to do, on the assets list interface for example, to further improve our efficiency during the events.
We also need to work on the automatization of bracket displays for a tournament. Optimisation of the visual assets on the webpages is also a wide subject, as they sometimes heavily drew on our Stream PC’s resources.
For the Version.2 of the
Live Mod of the ESWC website, we need to be able to display the results in a structured view, for groups and brackets both, and not just a list of matches. This will ensure a better understanding of the progress of the tournament for the spectators.

What new feature would you like to see added to Toornament?

We expect the Toornament.com API to allow us to fetch the detailed game-related statistics it gathers from the official game’s API, like in League of Legends or DOTA2 for example.
Also, the more information about the tournaments are available through the API (both to read and write), the better for us, as it will enable a wide range of tools and displays about the tournament and its participants!

We would like to thank Sylvain for his time, to showcase and present his tools, and answer our questions.
As for the last one, detailed statistics have been disabled on Toornament since the release of the new version, but they are bound to come back really soon, and all these data will be available through our API, just like the rest, so expect an even better experience for the next ESWC event!

Nintendo Switch games are available on Toornament!

The increasing popularity of the Nintendo new hybrid console brings brand new games to its catalogue. The ones with a competitive side are already available on Toornament, for epic competitions and tournaments! Here is a non-exhaustive list of popular Switch games available for you!


Do we really need to introduce Mario Kart? The licence is back in a Deluxe edition for the Switch, based upon its Wii/Wii U big brothers with new characters, karts and other features such as an 8-players local mode, a LAN mode and a fully unlocked game from the get-go. So time to throttle on and prove the world you’re the best Kart racer there is!


ARMS is a brand new fighting licence coming to life on the Nintendo Switch. You embody fighters with extensive weaponized arms, to try and knock out your opponent(s) in fast-paced and intense arms fights. The premises of this game are just too good to pass up on a tournament!


Splatoon is also back on the Switch with a new opus, soberly titled “Splatoon 2”, in which the goal is still to splatt ink all over the different levels, while the enemy team will do just the same, just with another color. New game modes, features and weapons are announced for the title, released on the 21st of July!


1-2 Switch is a collection of mini-games, bound to keep you busy for hours of friendly fun, but why not make things a bit more spicy with a tournament made up of several different mini-games, or to decide who is the best at Samurai Training or Soda Shake?


Pokken Tournament is a fighting game featuring our favorite pocket monsters. The game will be release on the Switch on the 22nd of September, but in the meantime, some tournaments are already happening! New characters are already announced for this Switch version, and more are bound to come!


Street Fighter II is probably the most emblematic episode of this emblematic series. It’s back on the Switch with a not-so-sober title, “Ultra Street Fighter II: The Final Challengers”, but the fundamentals are here, with all the iconic characters, levels and techniques that built the series!


Bomberman is back on the Switch with Super Bomberman R, a new opus of the famous licence, where up to 8 players will be able to fight until they explode for the win. New power-ups, 3D environments and characters and a solo campaign are here to propel this new game.

So wait no more, and create or participate in your first Switch tournament!

This week-end: ESWC Summer 2017

Since its lastest edition of February in Paris, and before the next Paris Games Week, ESWC will hold its Summer Edition, organized for the first time in Bordeaux, France, on Saturday 1st and Sunday 2nd of July, 2017.
For this special occasion, a lot of things are bound to happen in the 1500m² of the Bordeaux Palais des Congrès. Tournaments, animations, live streams and the likes of it will rhythm the week-end.
See below for the tournaments that will be played during the ESWC Summer:

For the third event in a row the ESWC will host a Clash Royale tournament during the ESWC Summer 2017 from 1st to 2nd July at Bordeaux. This new challenge will gather 32 finalists for a cash prize of 5,000€ split between the top four players. However, to be part of the event players will have to fight their way through qualifiers or to be directly selected.

After having invested in esports last February, FDJ first ever international competition is about to come to an end during the ESWC Summer, with the Finals of the FDJ Masters League on Street Fighter V. 32 european players participated in the qualifiers, and it’s down to 4 finalists for the conclusion on the Main Stage with a $20.000 cash prize to grab!

Invocators, it’s time to bring your troops together for the ESWC Summer Cup with OMEN by HP tournament on League of Legends at Bordeaux. Open to 32 French teams the LAN is aimed at both amateur, streamer and pro teams.

Other notable events contain but do not limit to:

Use Case: Student Gaming Network

From March to May was held in France a huge student Esports competition, organized by the Student Gaming Network. Students from all over the country battled in several games for the title and their name on top of the list.
Now that the tournaments are over, we met with its organizers to learn more about the whole deal.

To start, please introduce yourself and your project

“Hello, I am Pilou, member of the Student Gaming Network, a federation of french student gaming associations.
The association’s goal is to federate students around a common passion: video games. The major event we are organizing for the second year in a row is a national inter-school competition, the Student Gaming League.”

Overwatch finals being played in the School 42

“First on League of Legends, Hearthstone and Counter-Strike:GO, we added Overwatch to the game pool this year. The tournament is mainly played online, with finals organized as offline events. Last year was during an evening in the Paris Meltdown, and this year in the School 42 for a whole week-end.
We are also the instigators of the first European student tournament, in association with our English, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian counterparts: the University eSport Masters.”

How did you discover Toornament?

“Since the first edition, we’ve been using Toornament to manage our tournaments, which we discovered a bit by chance while looking for a platform to organize our competitions on.
After testing several of them, we chose Toornament for its simplicity, its very complete environment, its development perspectives and also because it’s Made in France :)”

What features are you using the most on Toornament?

“On the Organizer‘s side, I think we have quite a complete usage of the platform.
We use Toornament for registrations (which are free), for the whole infrastructure and competition management (structure, results, matches…) and to display tournaments’ information to our spectators (thanks to the widgets and schedules). Tournament management being the core of our project, we really feel at home with these aspects of Toornament.

On the Developer‘s side, we only started tinkering with it this year, but wish to keep pushing forward. Toornament’s API is well-documented and we can see a lot of possibilities using it. Today, we indirectly use it with DoxMatch, our partner platform that directly pushes CS:GO results to the platform.

Unfortunately, we do not make the most of the Participant dashboard yet, which has been evolving a lot for a year, especially for Hearthstone. We are thinking about a way to take advantage of it, for us, but mainly for our next participants.”

Can you develop on your tournaments and their formats?

“The general principle for our competition is as follows: 1 game = 1 evening.
In 2017, it amounted for 102 LOL teams on Mondays, 150+ HS players on Tuesdays, 63 CS:GO teams on Wednesdays and 34 OW teams on Thursdays.
Qualifiers went for 4 to 5 weeks after which the 16 or 32 best participants were selected to play the final bracket.

The Student Gaming League format is a very interesting subject because it tremendously evolved between the two editions, and might just change again for the next one.

On first year, we had a pretty complex system made up of pools dispatched into two leagues with promotion-relegation as qualifiers. It was far from ideal for players, because the qualified teams were not always the best ones, and even worse for us admins because this specific format is not natively available on Toornament. Admins suffered a great deal every evening, and we had to change the format.

After the first competition ended, we wanted to know the motivations of our participants, to have our next edition revolve around what they really wanted.
We realized that two kind of participants emerged: the ones here to play for fun because it was a good reason to gather as students to play with an incentive, and the really competitive ones who registered to go the furthest they could in the tournament.”

Counter-Strike:GO Winners

“That’s why this year, we opted for the Swiss System for all of our games. We wanted a format that would guarantee the best teams would qualify, while allowing more “casual” players to enjoy the tournament too, at least for as long as qualifiers would last. The Swiss System ensures a permanent balancing of matches, to have teams of similar skill level play each other. It prevents massive “stomps” after just 2 or 3 matches, which no one enjoys.
We converted the try, since our weekly team participation went through the roof: on LOL, almost 90% of the participating teams went through the whole qualifier, whereas almost 40% of them dropped last year. Those numbers are to put into perspective with the fact that it’s a long tournament (5 to 10 weeks) and free (no financial involvement needed).

For next year, new challenges are waiting, like reducing the time between matches during tournament nights. First feedbacks from our players are very positive on this new organization, and we can’t wait to play with the new Toornament Structure System to be even more creative when will come the time to create our new format, to fulfill our participants’ needs.”

Could you tell us a bit more about your Discord Bot and your use of the Toornament API?

I will let our developer, Ryan, talk to you about it.

Ryan: “In the Student Gaming Network, we wanted to drastically improve the players’ experience by experimenting with small features to make the difference.
First of all, our tools were using Toornament for three steps during our tournament nights:

  • The Check-in
  • Match announcement to players
  • Results gathering”

Participants checking-in, and the SGL Bot listing the absent ones

“We created a special Check-in, because we wanted our admins to be able to make Captains’ change and manual Check-ins and more importantly, our participants had to Check-in from Discord.
As for match announcements, the idea was to allow players to have their next matches displayed in Discord, with notifications. We had to settle down for a simple command that would allow them to display their next match.
Moreover, results gathering was a huge plus, Toornament doing it automatically for most of our games, we only had to take care of Hearthstone and Overwatch ourselves.

All of these tools were developed during the competition, with very little time and few tests performed.”

What feature would you like to see in Toornament?

“A better Check-in feature would be good, with more flexibility, mostly automatic but with manual input from an admin possible in case it’s needed.
This year, we encountered a limit with disqualified participants. This is an important subject, and we’d like a real “Drop” feature to cut a participant out of a tournament after it has started, to avoid bye matches.”

We would like to thank the SGL Organizers for the time they took to answer our questions, and congratulate them for their massive work and successful tournaments.
Congratulations to the winners and all their opponents too!
See you next year for new exciting tournaments and even more awesome organization!

New streaming provider: Mixer

A new streaming service is now supported by Toornament: Mixer.
Mixer is a Microsoft next-gen streaming service that offers viewers real-time influence and participation in live game streams.
Real-time and interactivity are the cornerstones of this new service, and you can start broadcasting from XBox One or Windows 10 in a few clicks, without having to install any extra software.

When selecting the streams for your tournament, you can now add a Mixer URL and attach the stream to the matches of your tournament. That will display the stream directly on the Public and Match pages for spectators to see.
The process is detailed HERE.

E3 2017: What’s new for Esports?

This year was the 23rd edition of the E3, also known as Electronics Entertainment Expo, in Los Angeles.
Many announcements have been made, but we are going to focus on what may be important for Esports world-wide.

So let’s see, in chronological order, what conferences have unveiled for Esports:

The first conference of this year’s Expo was Electronic Arts’. They fired announcements like a machine-gun, with some new titles and a lot of famous licenses sequels. Among those, the sports games had the place of honor, with Fifa 18, Madden 18 and NBA Live 18. The first one is already a well-established esports game, and NBA is going to become a huge actor in the landscape really soon, so who knows what the future has in store for Madden and other sports games?
They also announced some new content for Battlefield 1, with a new game mode, clearly competition-oriented, with smaller teams and lively maps. Story to be continued…

Microsoft hit hard this year, with a new console ready to hit the stores. The Xbox One X (or Project Scorpio) is about to become the most powerful console ever. What we know is that it features full retro-compatibility with previous consoles (games & accessories), and no doubt Microsoft will bet on it to be their new go-to platform for esports.
On games, two epic licenses with esports potential will see sequels this year: Forza 7 and Dragon Ball FighterZ.
The conference was also the occasion to bring up the updates to come for PLAYERUNKNOWN’S BATTLEGROUNDS (that will be available on the Xbox One X), and a newcomer in the Arena-Survival genre: The Darwin Project.

If you need to remember only one thing from the Bethesda’s conference, it’s the resurgence of Quake esports. After having been one of the first ever esports titles, Quake is back with the recently released Quake Champions to reclaim its throne in the First Person Shooter category.
The competition will crown Quake World Champions, and $1,000,000 is up for grabs between Duel (1v1) and Sacrifice (4v4) game modes.

Just as usual, Devolver Digital went against the flow and offered a true WTF experience during their conference. Not much potential for Esports in their announcements, but a title which could feature a true competitive side: Serious Sam Bogus Detour, a top-down 2D shooter with (Team) Deathmatch and other PVP modes, available this summer.

Ok, this is no Esports, but i can’t not mention it… Beyond Good & Evil 2 is nigh!
Ubisoft also announced the next edition of Just Dance, which will probably see its World Cup start soon!
Skulls & Bones has been unveiled, featuring tactical naval battles, playable in solo or 5-players teams, and with a strong emphasis on competitiveness to become a legendary pirate!
They also decided to encroach on Cardgame’s territory, with a South Park game, very soberly titled Phone Destroyer, with cards from the South Park universe and a real-time multiplayer mode, so Wait’n See!

Sony made a point of honor giving space to Virtual Reality during the conference with many titles designed for VR, or existing titles becoming compatible with the PSVR.
On games’ side, the next Call of Duty opus, CoD WWII was displayed with a very dynamic trailer. The next Pro League will be played without jetpack or futuristic weapon, but with historic weapons and flamethrowers…
To be noted also, GT Sport, next opus of the legendary Gran Turismo series, with a beta soon available in Europe and UK!

On Nintendo’s side, a lot of big announcements for sequels to the legendary licenses of the brand. Mario, Kirby, Yoshi, Pikachu, Samus Aran or Link, no one was left behind.
But several titles are leaning towards Esports, with Splatoon 2, Arms and Poken Tournament, which see tournaments every day on their E3 stage!
Moreover, the release of Rocket League on the Switch, with a full cross-platform support, means that you should be able to compete in the next Championship Series from your Nintendo console!

Finally, outside of conferences was announced the Injustice 2 Pro Circuit, with ELEAGUE returning to fighting games after their Street Fighter V Invitational to host the $250.000 World Championship in October.
Supercell also revealed their new game with a Youtubers’ tournament: Brawl Stars (already available on iOS) , an arena shooter, definitely competitive, with 12 different brawlers, several game modes and maps.

The end of the year will definitely be exciting for all esports fans, and 2018 is bound to be even better!

How to and why use Tiebreakers?

Sometimes, your participants will be so evenly matched and highly-skilled that they end up being tied at the end of a stage. This can only happen in non-elimination stages, meaning Round-Robin Groups, Leagues and Swiss Stages.

When a tie occurs, several options are open to you, you can have the tied participants play tiebreaker matches, but it’s going to be hard to pull out if you have more than 2 participants tied, or a lot of ties, like in the case of a huge Swiss System stage with hundreds of participants. So the best option often comes down to having automatic tiebreakers used to… break the ties!

You can find them under the “Advanced” tab of the Stage Configuration menu:

We have plenty of those for you to choose from, that work conjointly with the Points Attribution System, to allow you to fine tune your ranking. Here’s an overview of all available tiebreakers:

Match-Based

Points (overall) (not visible)
Most points obtained on all matches.
This is the default ranking system, used in the first place, to create the ranking. That’s when ties happen that need to be broken thanks to more advanced systems.

Match wins/draws/losses (overall)
Most wins, then draws, and then losses obtained on all matches.
Takes into account all matches played, and ranks with number of Wins, Draws, Losses (a loss is better than no match played).

Match wins/draws/losses (head-to-head)
Most wins, then draws, and then losses only from matches between the tied participants.
Takes into account matches played between ranked participants, and ranks with number of Wins, Draws, Losses.

Points (head-to-head)
Most points obtained only from matches between the tied participants.
Similar to the “Match Win/Draw/Loss (head-to-head)” tiebreaker, but based on points (in case you have alternative ways of attributing points).

Score-based

(Difference between Score and Match result)

Match score for (overall)
Highest sum of scores obtained on all matches.
Takes into account the sum of scores obtained through all matches played.

Match score for (head-to-head)
Highest sum of scores obtained only from matches between the tied participants.
Takes into account the sum of scores obtained through matches between tied participants.

Match score against (overall)
Lowest sum of scores the opponents obtained on all matches.
Takes into account the sum of opponent’s scores obtained through all matches played.

Match score against (head-to-head)
Lowest sum of scores the opponents obtained only from matches between the tied participants.
Takes into account the sum of opponent’s scores obtained between tied participants.

Match score difference (overall)
Highest score difference on all matches.
Takes into account the difference between “Score For” and “Score Against” in all matches played.

Match score difference (head-to-head)
Highest score difference only from matches between the tied participants.
Takes into account the difference between “Score For” and “Score Against” in all matches between the tied participants.

Number of matches

Most played matches
Participants with the most played matches.
Will break a tie in favor of the participant having played the highest number of matches.

Least played matches
Participants with the least played matches.
Will break a tie in favor of the participant having played the lowest number of matches.

Misc.

Manual
Most points set manually by the organizer.
Allows you to manually set “Tiebreaker” points directly in the Matches ranking, to break ties according to other rules you may have.

Random
Randomly at each ranking calculation.
Randomly break the ties every time a match is played that creates a tie.

Swiss System exclusives

Buchholz
Most points obtained by the participant’s opponents.
Takes into account the points earned by the participant’s opponents, to try and determine which participant had the “best” opponents, and deserve to win the tie.

Median-Buchholz
Most points obtained by the participant’s opponents, except the best and worst results.
Just like the Buchholz, except we ignore the best and worst scores from opponents, to create a median value, which is often more representative.

Cumulative
Most points obtained by the sum of points cumulated on each round.
Takes into account the order in which matches were played and won, to compensate for the relative randomness of early matches.

Cumulative opponent’s score
Most points obtained by the sum of points cumulated by the opponents on each round.
Same principle as the “Cumulative” tiebreaker, just with participant’s opponents’ results.

You now have everything you need to configure your ranking the way you need or want!

How to organize your first tournament

Whether you’re a tournament organizer at heart, or have participated in tournaments and now wish to move forward and organize your own, Toornament is the platform to go, with a huge range of settings and possibilities for you to create your dream competition.
In this article, we’re going to see how to create and run your very first tournament, nice and steady.

1. Create the tournament


In your Organizer Dashboard, you’re gonna see this button to create a new tournament. Simply click it, and fill in the required information. As always, the more the better, as it will allow your participants to learn all they need to know about the tournament they’re about to play in!
If you have other administrators to manage the tournament with you, we have a whole Permissions System to let you organize things and have everyone able to do his job!

2. Choose a structure/format


The next step is for you to choose what kind of tournament you want to play. How many participants are you going to pit against each other? Will they all play a League or Swiss System? Or maybe you want to split them into several Groups, and then seed the best ones in a Bracket? The choice is yours, and if you need a hand making your pick, we got some advice for you: how many phases to play and which format to choose.

3. Manage your participants


Here, two choices are open for you: either you manually create your participants, or open the registrations to your tournament. Even if you create them manually, filling in the correct email address will link the participants to the tournament. You can also enable custom fields for your participants to fill, if you need more information about them.

4. Publish your tournament


Next logic step, unless you prefer keeping your tournament private, is publishing it, so that potential participants can find it, and apply for registration.
Publishing your tournament will make it visible to everyone both on the website and the mobile app, doubling the chances that people will stumble upon it and register!

5. Place your participants


When your participants are created, or accepted through registrations, your next mission is to place them in the structure you’ve created. The detailed process is explained here, but to make it quick, you get to choose which stages each participant will play in, who they’re gonna face, when and in what order.

6. Enter match results


In most of the cases, match results will have to be manually entered. If you enabled the Participant Report, your participants will be able to report their results after each match they play in your tournament, both on the website and the mobile app. You’ll only be needed in case a dispute emerges.
As of now, two exceptions to this rule of thumb, with the LOL Tournament Codes and CS:GO eBot, allowing you to automatize the result report.

7. Share your tournament


You have a nice tournament, up and running, now is the time to share it with the world! By the way, if you opted for the Registration process for your participants, this part comes way earlier, because you will have to share the tournament for participant to register in it. A few rules of thumb here are to make your front page look good, to try and attract the spotlight and to promote your tournament.

8. Get creative with our API


For more advanced organizers, or professional ones, we have a free and open API that can help you improve your video and/or stream production with statistics overlays, results and the likes of it. It can also be used to develop tools to ease your life with tournament’s management!
Another great application would be the creation of stats infographics, like the one we did for the Just Dance World Cup.