Developers: Version 2 and API Modifications

maintenance V2 Release is scheduled on the 31st of May, and all changes listed in this article will then become effective.

Introduction

With the new version just around the corner, it is time for us to address organizers/developers using our API on what’s about to change for them.
First of all, we’d like to take this opportunity to remind everyone that the Toornament API is still in a beta state, and a constant work in progress, changes are bound to happen, and all feedback is, as usual, appreciated and taken into account.

To the users of our Scheduling Tool or CS:GO Bots (eBot and AdminBot), nothing to worry about, those will still work perfectly fine, the bots just won’t be able to send stats for a while, but without creating any issue.

New pagination system

Two endpoints now have parameters pagination:

  • GET tournaments/{tournament_id}/participants
  • now has 256 items per page (no change for tournaments with less than 256 participants)

  • GET tournaments/{tournament_id}/matches
    now has 100 items per page

Changes in the “Matches” endpoints

  • ALL /tournaments/{tournament_id}/matches/...

In all endpoints, the timezone property now returns null in matches and does nothing if you try to send Timezone information.
You have to use the one situated in the tournament’s endpoint.
The date properties are now returned with the Timezone setting of the tournament.

  • GET /tournaments/{tournament_id}/matches
  • GET /tournaments/{tournament_id}/matches/{id}
  • GET /disciplines/{discipline_id}/matches

When set to 1, the with_games parameter will no longer return participants information. They can be found in the match opponent properties.

Deprecated feature: Schedule

  • GET /tournaments/{tournament_id}/schedules

We are not talking about match schedules here, but the Schedule feature, used to create events linked to the tournament.
This one goes down the drain entirely, and the endpoint returns an empty array.

Stages endpoints

  • GET /tournaments/{tournament_id}/stages
  • GET /tournaments/{tournament_id}/stages/{number}
  • GET /tournaments/{tournament_id}/stages/{number}/view

The tournament engine has been rebuilt from scratch and now uses a brand new staging system.
The current stages API endpoints will no longer be working, a new version of the endpoints will be released soon.

Game statistics

Upon the release of the new version, game statistics as seen in CS:GO (when a bot is used), DOTA2, League of Legends and Bloodbowl 2 won’t be available.
Their return is a priority to us. In the meantime, all endpoints properties related to specific game statistics (opponent lineup, pick&bans etc.) will return null.
The API used to write statistics with the CS:GO bots will return code 200 responses, but with no action attached.

The API documentation will be updated with all these modifications when the V2 is released on the 31st of May.

Use Case: Super Evil Megacorp (Vainglory)

Last week-end was played the first ever Western Unified Tournament in Vainglory, with teams from both Europe and North America competing for the honor of being the first champion, and their fair share of the $60.000 Cash Prize.
In case you missed it, all the results can be found on Toornament:

We’ve been working hand in hand with Super Evil Megacorp from the get go, in their attempt at making their game a huge esports title, and it’s time to take a look back at the long way already made, and what’s still to do.

First things first, please introduce yourself and your company

Hello! My name is Heini Vesander, and I am the Executive Producer for esports at Super Evil Megacorp. Super Evil is a game studio based in San Mateo, California. We build soulful, beautiful core gaming experiences for the next generation of gamers on touch screens.

Could you present your game Vainglory?

Heini:Sure thing! Vainglory is a MOBA for mobile, and the world’s #1 mobile esport. We launched the game in July 2015, after an early release phase, and we’re excited about how enthusiastic our community is! Vainglory is a full-on MOBA for iOS and Android. Players play on a team of 3 against another team of 3 and the goal is to destroy the Vain crystal in the opponent’s home base. The game is about outplaying your opponents real-time using powerful heroes and perfecting team coordination. The game is free to play and download – and there’s no timers or energy mechanics. So players can play as much as they want.

Vainglory is a mobile game, built with Esports in mind, what is your take on Esports on mobile?

Heini:Vainglory was built with the aim to build a deep, meaningful player experience on mobile. A game that’s community-driven and fun to play with friends. We built Vainglory ground up for mobile, without trying to casualize the MOBA genre – nor make a direct port from another platform. In doing so, we built a game that is competitive and fun to watch. We dreamt that the game would become an esport, but honestly, the community surprised us by organizing competitive tournaments way before we even said “esports”. Based on feedback from the community, we added a spectator mode and later a built a spectator client that runs on a mac to empower esports.

The Western Unified Championship stage, in London – ©ESL UK

And so, we believe in the potential of mobile esports. Especially if you look at the numbers – 700 million PCs out there, and 3 billion smartphones. Some day soon, mobile esports will become big. Weather the leading title will be Vainglory or something else remains to be seen. We’re super excited about the growth of our competitive scene, and we’ve welcomed amazing teams like Fnatic, Cloud9, Echo Fox, TSM and G2 esport. We’ve also seen homegrown teams like Hammers and Gansktars succeed. It’s still early days for mobile esports and we’re very excited about the near future.

The Western Unified Championship Trophy, lifted by the winners, Cloud9 – ©ESL UK

How did you discover Toornament?

Heini:The very first Vainglory community tournaments were run by VGL (vaingloryleague.com), and they were using the Toornament platform. It proved to work really well. What we really like is how easy the tournament brackets are to share on social media and especially on websites. VGL inspired us to use Toornament for our Vainglory8 broadcasts!

What are the features you use most on Toornament?

Heini:What’s really great with Toornament is how easy it is to organize and handle big tournaments. It’s also very easy to share access to the many people involved. The platform’s simple design works both for desktop and mobile, and the app is an easy way for teams to follow the status of the tournament.

What feature would you like to see added to Toornament?

Heini:Our first wish is a feature that allows us to schedule multiple matches and series to specific dates and times. Currently, each match needs to be reported manually, which makes the process complicated and slow when the brackets are big. Our second wish is an improved way for teams to report their scores and screenshots of end-of-match.

We’d like to thank Super Evil Megacorp for their trust in our platform, and especially Heini Vesander for having taken the time to answer our questions. As for his wishes, one has already been almost fulfilled, with our Scheduling Tool that allows organizers to batch edit their match schedules on a single page, and many more things possible thanks to our API.
We will keep improving the experience of our users, organizers and participants alike, and we take into account and study every feedback that’s made to us!

HOTS Spring Season is coming to an end

After tough times for its MOBA title, Blizzard has decided to put on a great spread for his new 2017 season with the launch in 2016 of the Heroes Global Championship (HGC), an A-Team league that runs in North America, Europe, China and Korea in a double round robin league format. Teams are earning compensation just for participating, and several international events are set with massive cash prizes. Each season sees a Mid-Season Brawl, divided into Western and Eastern regions, and ends on a Season Championship.

Slots available for the Spring Championship

Having your Esports infrastructure evolve is one thing, but the game itself needed a serious redoing, because of the competition that League of Legends and DOTA2 provide. This led to the release, one month ago, of Heroes of the Storm v2.0, a huge update that didn’t influence the meta, but added a whole lot of new features and contents to the game, among which new heroes, events, battlegrounds and a brand new progression system.

The Phase 1 of the Spring Season is now over for almost a week, and as usual, we have all the results and replays, in case you missed any of it:

This League play was divided into two parts, to let the teams have a break, between mid-february and mid-april, period when was played the Clashes, with teams coming from the leagues, but also teams from minor regions such as ANZ and LATAM:

As for Europe and North America, two teams will advance to the Championship. The first one being the Top Rank from the League Play:

  • ts Tempo Storm in North America
  • fnatic Fnatic in Europe

They will be joined by a second team, winner of the Season Playoffs, that will pit Ranks 2 to 6 from the League Play in a gauntlet-style bracket (meaning it is a single-branch bracket where better seeds from the League get byes into later stages):

Those playoffs will be played over the week-end, and as stated, only one team will come out of each, to try their skill against teams from all over the world in the Spring Championship, set to take place mid-june.

For our french community, Millenium is currently running qualifiers for their Storm Cup, with a 4,000€ cashprize. There are two qualifiers remaining, and you can apply to both of them!

Pour notre communauté française, sachez que Millenium organise actuellement des qualifications pour la Storm Cup, un tournoi à 4000€ de CashPrize dont les phases finales seront jouées à Paris. Il reste deux tournois de qualification, et vous pouvez vous inscrire aux deux!

Présentation du Tournoi

Qualification #3Qualification #4

Toornament v2: Release date and what to expect

Introduction

We’ve been hinting and teasing you with our upcoming Version 2 for almost 5 months now, and it’s time we put and end to it.

The Release Date will be the 31st of May!

maintenance The migration to the new version will cause an interruption in service on that day! More information to come soon, but the platform will not be available for a few hours during office hours (CEST)

Organizers, participants and spectators will discover our new platform, that is going to look a lot like the old one, but built on a brand new tournament engine, built from scratch on a new database running on a new servers infrastructure, allowing much more traffic than what is currently possible. For starters, changes will mainly be on the Organizers’ side, here they are.

Tournament Size

4096_part
The maximum size of a tournament will go from 256 (current limit) to 4096 thanks to the new tournament engine and infrastructure.

New Structure System

structure-v2-1
More freedom, more flexibility! You are now 100% free when it comes to creating a tournament and its structure. You can have stages played along, of different size, with participants coming in at any stage of your tournament.

Learn more about the Structures

New Placement System

v2_a
Along our new structure system comes a brand new way of placing participants into your stages. The seeding and the placement were merged into a single interface to allow for a clearer experience, with new options for you to choose who plays where.

Learn more about the Placement

New Widgets

widgets_v2
Another field that needed attention were our widgets. They are now clearer and more user-friendly, and just as beautiful as the rest of the site!

Learn more about the Widgets

Other Changes

Many other aspects of the platform are going to undergo some sort of change, among which:

  • Organizer Dashboard now has the same stylesheet as the other parts of the website, and an increasing compatibility with mobile
  • A few changes inbound on the API, with more detail available next week
  • Game stats (as seen in LOL, DOTA2, CS:GO or Bloodbowl 2) won’t be available immediately upon release. They will be back, with all previous data restored, as soon as possible
  • Some least used features disappeared, to simplify the tool and make it the most efficient it can be

What to expect next?

The Version 2 being out means that we are going to go back to working on new features and improvements, after having spent those last few months dedicated to the task at hand.
We already made good progress towards some of the most requested features from our organizers:

  • Tournament and match check-in
  • Match chat system (first available on the web platform, on the mobile app next), as seen below:

user_chat

This is just the beginning, so stay tuned for a whole lot of new features and exciting stuff to come in the future, because we’re only getting started!

Toornament v2: Widgets

In the scope of our new version, we have had to rethink the widgets entirely. Lots of organizers have given us their feedback, and we are proud to present them, and you, our new widgets!

All changes have been made with one main issue in mind: Clarity.

Being embedded on different parts of websites, widgets have to be clear, intelligible and easy to use. This could be achieved by following two guidelines:

  • No more navigation. What you see is what you get. No scrollbar, no menu, all information is immediately visible and accessible.
  • A modern, stripped down and refined style, to emphasize important information.

When the new version hits, the tournament widget will no longer be a single entity, but will be divided into several separate widgets. No menu to navigate from one to the other. There will be a widget for each one of these categories:

  • Participants
  • Matches List
  • Groups List
  • Bracket
  • Information & Registration

On the 31st of May, release date of the Version 2, the first widget available will be the Information & Registration one, which will be used as a placeholder for the tournament widget, whatever page it was on. It comes in 4 variations, depending on the tournament status. All will be available in the Light mode visible here, and in a Dark mode shortly after.

widget_infos

Tournament has not started yet

widget_reg

Tournament has not started yet, and registrations are open

widget_running

Tournament is currently running

widget_over

Tournament is over

The other widgets will be coming shortly after the V2 is out, and the first one in line is the Participants one:

widget_participants

Work-in-progress for the Participants Widget

This week’s Open Community tournaments are about shooting…

So, do you like to shoot people in video games? But maybe you’d rather shoot a ball? Or your thing might be shooting for the stars? Either way, we have the tournaments for you, with our weekly selection of Open Community Tournaments.
Many of this week’s tournaments will be played offline, so beware before registering, and make sure you can make it to the venue to try and grab the title for yourself!

csgo Counter-Strike: Global Offensive Open Tournaments

denmark SkiveLAN #2.by SkiveLAN.dk – LAN 50 Teams 12/05/2017
14/05/2017
Register
germany LIGA S1 Division2 LQ2
by Twenty E-Sports – Online
32 Teams 14/05/2017 Register
canada ComicCup MTL 2017
by ComicCon eSports – Online & LAN
16 Teams 15/05/2017
14/07/2017
Register
slovakia eXRiders 1on1 Cup #2
by eXRiders – Online
16 Players 19/05/2017
20/05/2017
Register

fifa17 FIFA 17 Open Tournaments

cotedivoire Gamers CI #3
by Gamers CI – Online
32 Players 13/05/2017 Register
india GSI Online Cup
by Gamers Spot India – Online
32 Players 13/05/2017 Register
czech 2vs2 RealitaGamingBar
by Realita Gaming Bar – LAN
20 Teams 14/05/2017 Register
netherlands 1vs1 XBox May Cup
by EAthletics – Online
32 Players 20/05/2017
21/05/2017
Register

overwatch Overwatch Open Tournaments

france E-Lan Overwatch Maiby E-LAN ESIEA – Online 6 Teams 12/05/2017
13/05/2017
Register
unitedstates NETGEAR Tournament
by NETGEAR & AFKgg – LAN
32 Teams 13/05/2017
14/05/2017
Register
canada ComicCup MTL 2017
by ComicCon eSports – LAN
32 Teams 17/05/2017
08/05/2017
Register

vainglory Vainglory Open Tournaments

europe Lunaris Draft EU
by Lunaris – Online
64 Teams 14/05/2017 Register
brazil NSA Championship
by NSA Inc. – Online
8 Teams 14/05/2017
28/05/2017
Register
unitedstates TDM 3v3 Draft
by iDMG – Online
8 Teams 14/05/2017
30/06/2017
Register

You are an organizer, and would like us to showcase one of your upcoming tournaments? Feel free to contact us on Twitter or Facebook!

Toornament v2: Placement

After our introduction to the upcoming structure system, now is the time to see how another very important feature is going to work in the Version 2: the placement.

Currently, the placement works as follows:

  • You start by creating your participants, and a participant number is attributed to each (in the order of creation by default, can be manually modified), which serves as a starting seed in the tournament.
  • You can then place your participants in the first stage of your tournament, either with an automated method, that will use the starting seed, manually, or with a mix of both.
  • The placement is 100% live, meaning there is no preview and each and every change is immediately effective, and visible to everyone.
  • When your first stage is over, participants have an exit seed attributed to them, according to their results, and are then available for placement in the next one, and the cycle can start over again.

v1

Placement process in Toornament v.1

With the Version 2 and its new structure system, we had to come up with a unified placement feature that would fit the role while allowing maximum flexibility. We decided to merge the seeding and placement aspects into a single interface where you can add participants into the phase (because you have to remember that now, all participants don’t have to start in the first stage of a tournament, and can be freely sent into different stages) with a multi-selection modal window. A seed is then attributed to them depending on the order you pick them.

v2_modal

Selection modal in Toornament v.2

From there on, you can manually modify the seeds, and it will naturally modify their placement in the structure accordingly, either in the list on the left, or directly inside the preview on the right side of the screen, just like you use to do in the current version.

v2_a

Placement interface in Toornament v.2

It is now also possible to lock some of the participants in their attributed seeds. This serves one major purpose: locked seeds won’t change if you randomize the participants into the stage, meaning you can have seeds stay in place while you randomly add participants into the stage. Furthermore, re-generating a stage (by changing its size for example) does not alter the seeds, meaning all seeded participants will keep their seeds, and locked ones will remain locked.

v2_lock

Locked participants in Toornament v.2

Another major change is that this interface is now basically a preview, meaning you can edit things, try and test things out, but ultimately, nothing changes until you save.

v2_save

With this new system, it is still possible to manually place each and every participant, either all at once before starting your tournament, or step by step, even after the stage matches have started (but a participant with a result in one of its matches will become locked).
Plus, combined with the new structure system, this will allow for stages played at the same time (like several groups played in different stages, qualifiers or anything you might think of), you will be able to add and play tiebreaker matches, or showmatches…

There is one downside to reaching this level of freedom though, and it’s the loss of hard connections between stages, meaning there is no automatic method between stages, so for example, when your group stage is over, you’re going to have to select the winners from said group stage and seed them into the playoffs stage yourself.
But that is a small price to pay for all the amazing things you will be able to do with this new system, and we’re not done working on it just yet!

We are very excited to release the new version, and it will not be long before you hear about it again, so please bear the suspense, and it will soon be out!

Use Case: Cyber Espoirs League by the FQSE

We met with Patrick Pigeon and Cédrick Tremblay, Esports officials from Quebec, about their projects and how and why they came to use Toornament for them.

First things first, please introduce yourself and your association

Patrick Pigeon, C.E.O of the E-Sports Federation of Quebec (FQSE). I’ve been implicated in competitive video games and electronic sports for almost 20 years. I am one of the founders of the Federation that came into life in February 2016. It gathers student associations, schools, competition teams, players and other organizations linked to esports, all with a single objective: help develop the field in Quebec.

Cédrick Tremblay, C.E.O of Earthroot Gaming (their Twitter and Facebook). It’s a multi-platform organization established in Quebec, taking part in competitions all over the world. We are mainly famous for our Halo professional roster, Ryan Ford on Smash and Schemin on Madden as Top 10 players in the world. Earthroot Gaming brings professional players the help they need to progress, with personal resources management, tournaments organization and financial support. Earthroot Gaming was born in April 2015 and is currently in its 3rd year of existence.

Could you present your video games related projects and events?

Patrick: The federation is involved in many projects. Conferences, LAN, tournaments, leagues, shows, school projects are just some of our activites. Here are three of the main projects we are currently working on:

  • Exclusion Case: the Federation works since its creation to settle this issue (for more information, click here (FR))
  • The Cyber Espoirs League (LCE): league made from schools from Quebec. The project started on the 1st of April with a qualifier for an Overwatch tournament.
  • Quebec Cup [under development]: the Federation started the accreditation and regional check in preparation of the first Quebec Cup.
owlce
How did you discover Toornament?

Patrick: I saw several organizers from Quebec use it

What are the features you use most on Toornament?

Cedrick: It is actually a tough question. Of course, results and participant information are vital for a tournament platform like this one. I did enjoy the fact that we were able to fill precise date and time for each round and match. That is rare in other tournament platforms.

Tell us more about your mission to promote Esports through education and how Toornament helped you in doing so.

Cedrick: the FQSE is going to organize a full league (the Quebec Cup, mentioned earlier), and not just week-end tournaments. Hence, Toornament is really helpful with all the qualifiers, and will be even more when the league starts.

meltdownlce
What feature would you like to see added to Toornament?

Patrick: a clear and global ranking of participants at the end of a tournament, or at least the Top3.

Cedrick: Toornament should create a League system in which rules can be modified based on a Round basis, with for example participant information that could be changed between rounds (but remain visible on the previous ones).

One thing we can tell already, is that Cedrick’s wish is about to come true, with the release of our upcoming new version, and its new Structure System that will allow for much more versatility when it comes to handling long competition.

Thanks to Cedrick and Patrick for having taken the time to answer these few questions.

Esports are getting more popular, and structures more complex

As esports keep growing and attracting new actors and public, a foreseeable tendency emerges: diversification of tournament formats and structures. With countless new games and loads of organizers entering the fray, it was to be expected that standard sport formats would not be sufficient to cover every single case. Anyway, some organizers are going to great lengths to ensure the competitive integrity of their competition, even if it means going through major hassle with the structure itself, or its features.

By covering all the major competitions, we have come across a wide array of structures and formats, and some of them were… puzzling, to say the least.

buzzmeme

Oh, but we know you, words are good, but you want facts!
How about the now-standard Activision-MLG structure used for Pro Call of Duty events? It’s quite simple on paper, an Open Bracket where teams can freely apply, then try to qualify through a 4-groups Double-Elimination format. The four teams winning each group will qualify and join the 12 invited teams in the Open Pool, which only purpose is to seed them. Indeed, best 2 teams from each of the 4 Pools will enter the final Championship Bracket in the Winners Bracket, while 4th team from each group starts the competition in the Round 1 of the Losers Bracket, where they’ll fight teams having finished 2nd from the Open Bracket groups. Winners of Round 1 advance to Round 2 where they’re to face 3rd ranks from the Pool Play, and from here on, it becomes a standard Double-Elimination bracket.
So simple, right?
There is no questioning the competitive integrity or logic of such a structure… But what a headache for a new viewer who would like to spend some quality CoD time watching it live!

Another great example of such format, centered more on competitiveness that simplicity, is the world seeding-based international events happening in League of Legends. The Mid-Season Invitational Play-In Stage.1 just finished, and here’s what the whole Play-In stage looks like:

msi-playin
We explained the format and whole season in detail in a previous blog post

It’s basically about teams entering the tournament at different moments, with different structures, to reflect on their region’s past results in international events. It does make sense, but once again, the complexity of the format and its implications are deeply intertwined in the whole year’s competition, and one-time viewers probably won’t have the knowledge needed to understand the whole thing.

Which leads us to the Seasons, with their Leagues, Regional Splits, Mid-Season Brawls and other Major Events, Pro Circuits, Clashes, Promotion Matches and the likes of them… Easy to get lost in so many different competitions going at once, even if you’re only following a single game. Take League of Legends for example again, a standard year is composed of 2 Seasonal Splits & Playoffs, Promotion tournaments to promote/demote teams from the Professional League, a Mid-Season international event and the World Championship. Simple enough? Sure, but there are 13 different regions, each with its own ruleset and variations on this global format. And then, some teams qualify and they all mingle in the international events.

struct

Now, the vast majority of unique tournaments run with a well-known format, or a slight variation of it, with the Double-Elimination Bracket being more and more preeminent. But the increasing number of new and complex formats brings the question of whether esports will go large, or stay a niche hobby for people really into it. Sure, nothing prevents a casual viewer from enjoying a single match, or even a whole tournament, without understanding everything about it or its implications, but implication is precisely what drives (e)sports, when a connection appears and exists between fans and players/teams.
And with this, we have the 4 groups that need to be contended when organizing an esports event: organizer, teams, players, viewers. They all want a great tournament, but are not always looking for the same thing from it.

  • Organizer wants a format that runs smoothly and ensures competitive integrity.
  • Teams want their players to be able to perform at their best, but also a format that allow for their team to get ranked where they deserve.
  • Players want of course what their teams want, but also to have fun and have a shot at winning.
  • Viewers want the best viewing experience possible, and being able to cheer for their favorite team.

But there is no problem! Everything is compatible! Except no, not necessarily. For viewers to have a good experience, you have to have your matches played in a set timeframe, which will restrain how many matches you can play, meaning all teams won’t be able to play as much as they could, because you’ll have to eliminate some. So you go with a Seeding Group Stage, which doesn’t eliminate any team, but then, you take away the possibility for underdogs to create major upsets and rush a bracket with some state-of-the-art strategies and lucky strokes…

It’s all a complex balance, and to attain it, one must do sacrifices along the way, as no format will content everyone involved.
Hence, complex structures are becoming more and more common, and it might scare away newcomers. This was one of our driving factors when developing the upcoming Toornament new structure feature: allow for a complete freedom on the organizer’s side when it came to structures. This way, nothing would hinder an organizer from creating the competition he wants, to try and achieve that tough balance.

There is no denying, nor condoning or denouncing the fact that structures are becoming more complex, it is happening and we have to adapt. It may be prejudicial to some, but is a blessing to others, and while it requires more engagement to get into, it also shows how serious esports is becoming, with this constant search for the best, in all aspects.

First Season of the 2nd Year of R6S is in full swing, join the momentum!

First year of Competitive Rainbow Six: Siege has been a blast, with 3 seasons going from March to November. It ended in February with The Six Invitational (on PC and Xbox). We are now a bit further down the Year 2 road, and things have evolved quite a bit since last year. For starter, the roadmap and formats are different:

r6s-road-map

Just like last year, each season will see a Mid-Season Reinforcement, with major updates, new maps and operators being released into the game. The Velvet Shell Reinforcement introduced a brand new map, Coastline taking place in Spain, along two new Spanish operators:

  • jackal-icon Jackal, the attacker who can track your footsteps
  • jackal-icon Mira, the defender who can see through walls

As for the competition, 8 teams from each region will take part in the Pro League, consisting of regional group matches leading to the qualification for the Regional Playoffs. As for this first season, in case you missed anything, here are the results with replays:

Now that the groups are over, we are moving on to the LAN Regional Playoffs! Semifinals in North America have been played already, with the great absent being Continuum, current PC Champions, eliminated during the Group Stage.

As for Europe, the matches are scheduled to start on the 27th of April (as in tonight if you read this article the day it gets out!), and high level of play is to be expected!

Finally, last region, but not least, Latin America will see its semifinals be played on the 30th of April, after all 4 qualifying matches got dragged all the way to 3 games, and what games!

Stay tuned for more Rainbow Six: Siege action, and why not take part in one of our Community Open Tournaments yourself?